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Why the iPhone 7S could be better than the iPhone 8

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We’ve still got months until Apple even prints the invites for the iPhone 8 event, but rumors are starting to mount. The new flagship iPhone, likely named the iPhone 8, iPhone X or iPhone Edition, will likely have an edge-to-edge display with a curved glass front, no home button, a dual-camera setup and possibly some kind of facial recognition.

It all sounds great, but I think the iPhone 7 series might still have a shot at glory this year.

It all comes down to the tradeoffs that Apple is likely to make to create room for the iPhone 8’s standout features. Want a zero-bezel display with a curved front? That means no home button, and no Touch ID fingerprint sensor on the front either. There’s rumors that Apple will have some kind of under-screen fingerprint sensor, but some leaks are now suggesting that the Touch ID sensor will move to the back.

Without mincing words, that would be a disaster. Samsung is already getting major flak for moving the fingerprint sensor on the Galaxy S8 to the back. It sits right next to the camera sensor, causing endless fingerprints and smudges on the lens. A Samsung rep has already said that it was a deliberate design decision to try and free up more internal room for a battery, but the justification doesn’t really matter: it still leads to a terrible user experience.

It’s easy to think that Apple won’t fall into the same trap, but just look at last year. Removing the headphone jack was a consumer-hostile decision that is still causing me annoyance to this day. Moving the Touch ID sensor to the back would be a little less “courageous” than killing the headphone jack, so it’s easy to imagine Apple doing just that.

Other things make me already hesitant about the iPhone 8. Including a bunch of fancy features like curved glass, OLED screens and iris sensors is going to jack the price of the phone up, and there’s no way that Apple will take a hit on its historically fat profit margins. Instead, expect the iPhone 7S and 7S Plus to retail for about the same (or a little less) than the current iPhone 7, while the iPhone 8 could run close to $1,000. No thanks.

Even niggling details could be cause for concern. Apple has championed LCD screen technology for years, and it’s reasonable to think that there might be bugs in its first generation of OLED phones. Even Samsung, which produces screens in house and has been using AMOLED for years, still has problems with its screens. Waiting one year for Apple to work out the bugs in a new generation of device really wouldn’t be a bad idea.

I’m not saying that the iPhone 8 will be a flop, or that people won’t buy it. But if Apple comes out with an iPhone 7S at the same time, with the same processor and some of the same camera improvements as the iPhone 8 at a much lower price, waiting a year to jump on the iPhone 8 bandwagon might not be such a bad idea.

Fashion and music obsessed wanderlust. Resale clothing appreciator who fancies herself a well-crafted cocktail. Occasional photographer. Amateur sneaker head.

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This is the photo that conspiracy theorists say proves the Moon landing was a fraud

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In 1969, Neil Armstrong became the first human to set foot on the Moon. It was an incredible technological and scientific achievement for the human race, and the 11 other men who followed in his dusty footsteps are still the only humans to ever set foot somewhere other than Earth. That, of course, is assuming you believe the “official” account of things. If you’re on the fringes of the conspiracy community, on the other hand, you believe that the Moon landing was just a big lie cooked up by… lizard people or something, I guess.

Lots of “evidence” supporting the Moon landing hoax theory has cropped up in the past, but nothing has ever swayed the public as a whole. Now, hoax believers are pointing to an old photograph taken by an astronaut as potential proof that the lunar surface we see in Moon landing images is nothing more than a film set.

The photo in question comes from the Apollo 16 mission which took place in 1972. In the image, astronaut John Young is seen taking samples from the lunar surface. In the background, large boulders and smaller rocks litter the pale landscape, and a quick glance at the photograph doesn’t reveal anything particularly damning, but conspiracy theorists want you to take a much closer look.

Behind Young’s head, near the edge of the horizon, the supposed “boulder” is now the subject of debate. The photo’s description says that the background contains boulders as well as the Lunar Roving Vehicle, but conspiracy believers are seeing something else. Specifically, they believe that a lunar base is actually visible in the distance, along with additional personnel who weren’t supposed to be there.

This claim points to yet another fringe theory regarding the Moon landings. Rather than believing that the landings themselves were staged, a subset of the conspiracy community believes that NASA actually went to the Moon and found evidence of alien life there. Rather than tell the world about the discovery, they believe that NASA covered it up. The photo, they suggest, shows that NASA sent additional crew to the Moon after discovering extraterrestrial life, and even set up a lunar habitat there.

Or, as one YouTube commenter suggests, it’s probably “just a Starbucks.”

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Amazon’s running a lightning deal on the device that lets your phone see where no other phone can

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The Depstech 1200P Semi-rigid Wireless Borescope Camera is a new and improved version of one of the most popular products we’ve ever covered. In a nutshell, it’s a borescope camera that connects to your iPhone or Android phone wirelessly. Your phone becomes the viewfinder as you snake the camera into any space you want, allowing your phone to see where no normal smartphone can. You can also save the videos to view later. This cool camera comes with a hook and a magnet accessory as well, so you can lose it to retrieve jewelry or keys in seconds. It’s an awesome gadget and it’s on sale right now on Amazon. There’s a lightning deal going from 5PM until 11PM tonight, or while supplies last. You’ll save 20% during the deal, so hurry up and check it out.

Here are some bullet points from the product page:

  • Innovative WiFi Endoscope with great compatibility: different from endoscope camera in the market, this wireless wifi inspection camera will work with Android devices( Android 2.3+), as well as iPhone IOS system(iOS 6.0+). This makes the endoscope appeal to many users with various kinds of devices.
  • True 1200P Resolution Camera: reaching 1600×1200, this endoscope is able to capture HD snapshot of the unknown, mysterious places where the human eyes are difficult to catch the image, along with recording a vivid live- video in AVI format, available to be stored on your devices upon enabling the app to accessible to the Photo App.
  • CamTele Technology Seeing further & Wider: many professional technicians spare no efforts to develop the new technology, so this new product will have longer focal distance than common endoscope, getting rid of the limit within 1-3 inch, and the scope for a clear image can be extended to 15.7 inch, which will be more user-friendly in your inspection work.
  • Simple Operation Method – Turning on WiFi box to generate endoscope WiFi, connect your working device with the endoscope WiFi, and then just enjoy the expected view with our unique app “Depstech”.
  • Featuring 16.5FT cable, waterproof and 8.5mm diameter camera, 6 adjustable LED light on the camera, applicable for kinds of scenarios , regardless of dark area, damp or wet area etc. The semi-rigid cable can bend and hold it’s shape to access confined place, such as curved holes or pipes. Furthermore, it has a durable lithium battery, capacity up to 1800mAh which support 3-4h working time without LED light on, outshining other endoscopes with working time less than 1h.

 

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I want to live in AT&T’s fantasy world where prices actually go down

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We’re weeks into the court proceedings between AT&T, which is trying to buy Time Warner Inc, and the Justice Department that is suing to block the deal. We’ve heard from economic experts about how prices will soar, and from AT&T’s own execs about how cable is the company’s “cash cow.”

But on Thursday, we finally got to hear from AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson, and he stuck right to the party line. AT&T acquiring Time Warner wouldn’t drive up prices, Stephenson claimed: It will actually be the other way around.

Reuters reports that Stephenson told the court there would be cost savings from the merger:

He said that he wanted to combine what AT&T knew about its customers with Time Warner’s ability to create compelling content.

This would help AT&T, which owns the biggest pay TV company DirecTV, build a cheaper online product that could be partially sustained through advertising, he said.

AT&T’s own lawyer also brought up an initial assessment of the merger, produced by AT&T, which said the deal would have “no significant cost synergies.” Stephenson refuted that analysis and said that later studies showed that it would.

Washington Post reporter Brian Fung said that Stephenson also mentioned AT&T will be coming out with a new streaming service later this month. Called AT&T Watch, it will cost $15 per month instead of the $35 that AT&T currently charges for its streaming service, DirecTV Now. It won’t have any sports channels, however.

A new skinny streaming bundle is a good talking point for AT&T in court, but it doesn’t change the fact that historically, mergers in the telecoms industry have been shown to raise prices. AT&T has argued that this won’t apply to this particular merger, since Time Warner is a content company, not a telecoms company. The government (and all rational people who like to watch TV) argue that AT&T will use Time Warner’s content, which includes must-have channels like HBO and CNN, as leverage over its competitors to keep prices high and restrict the success of streaming services.

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